Thousands of Wild Buffalo Appear Out of Nowhere at Standing Rock

Sourced from: usuncut.com


Indigenous culture honors American bison (known as Tatanka Oyate, or Buffalo Nation) as a symbol of sacrifice, as the bison give their lives to provide food, shelter, and clothing through the use of their meat and their hides. Native Americans maintain a spiritual tradition with bison, believing that as long as buffalo — a gift from the Great Spirit — roam free and as long as the herds are bountiful, the sovereignty of indigenous people would remain strong.

And in the midst of mass arrests, mace attacks, and beatings from batons, a stampede of bison suddenly appeared near the Standing Rock protest camp. A cry of joy reportedly erupted from the Standing Rock Sioux, as they had been praying for assistance from the Tatanka Oyate during their standoff with riot police and national guardsmen.

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Editor’s note: This is one of the most beautiful stories I have read in quite awhile. I was weeping as I watched the video.  It is such an important reminder to us that animals are sentient Beings and that ALL life is connected.  

Dakota Access Pipeline Update: Police Remove Protesters. Arrests Made.

Sourced from: cnn

By Marlena Baldacci, Emanuella Grinberg and Holly Yan

Protesters and law enforcement faced off on Thursday.

CNN)Police in riot gear faced off with protesters on horseback as the monthslong protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline came to a head Thursday.

At least 117 protesters were arrested after law enforcement Humvees and helicopters began to flood the area to break up a protester encampment near the pipeline’s path.
Calling themselves “water protectors,” supporters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe set up tents and teepees on the land, about an hour south of Bismarck, which they said belongs to the tribe under a 19-century treaty.
But authorities said they are trespassing on pipeline property. Officials brought in reinforcements from seven states to remove protesters and dismantle roadblocks made of hay bales and wood.
As the standoff continued, police deployed bean bag rounds and pepper spray gas and unleashed a high-pitched siren to disperse the crowd.
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You May Want To Rethink Eating At Jimmy John’s After Reading This

Sourced from Davidwolfe.com

Many people are claiming they’ll never eat at Jimmy John’s restaurant again after photos surfaced that show the company’s owner posing with animals killed on various trophy hunting expeditions.

Can you imagine killing this animal for fun?

Full disclosure, what you’re about to see might be disturbing.

Business Insider reports that Jimmy John Liataud has visited Africa several times to take part in big game hunting. Animals he’s hunted include elephants, zebras, leopards and rhinos.

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This brilliant 13-year-old figured out how to make clean energy using a device that costs $5

Editor’s note: As I have been saying all year, having felt this intuitively, look to a lot of new technologies being released by the end of this year.  Brilliant!  And bravo to these young kids, who are paving the way with their ideas for a planet off-the-grid and with free energy!  

By: Lydia Ramsey

Maanasa Mendu thinks she’s cracked the code on how to make wind and solar energy affordable.

On Tuesday, Mendu, a 13-year-old from Ohio, won the grand prize in the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge for her work in creating a cost-effective “solar leaves” design to create energy. In addition to winning the title of “America’s Top Young Scientist,” she gets $25,000 for her achievement.

The leaves, designed to help developing areas in need of cheaper power sources, cost roughly $5 to make.

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Energy Update: Super High Solar Magnetic Winds

by Lisa Brown,

gamma ray burst We’ve gone Ultra-Sonic.

Super high geomagnetic solar winds started about an hour or two ago. These knock us on our butts. We go through an intense inability to function as we upgrade huge. The body goes weak, the mind goes mush. High high high charging protons/ions and these sound like razors, which are part of diamond light lasers. These re-calibrate our magnetics, they tune us high really fast. They “sing” us to sleep, literally, sooooooooooooo high in frequency, we basically cannot do anything else.

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Massive Coronal Hole on Sun

WSO Oct 26 Part 2 – Massive Coronal Hole on Sun Breaking Report

Warrior Water Protectors

Editor’s note:  These folks are hero’s.  I say let’s remove congress, the current administration, reject both Hillary and Trump and install these freedom fighters instead.  They speak Truth – with heart.  They care about the land, the environment and We The People.  I have the deepest, most humble gratitude for them.  Make this image viral by sharing.  Thanks to Mark Morey for this image.  

New Documentary On Free Energy

SURGE. A Free Energy Documentary Featurette Film

125 Arrested – Media Drones Shot Down By Police: Ongoing Violence At Dakota Pipeline Protests

“Today’s situation clearly illustrates what we have been saying for weeks, that this protest is not peaceful or lawful,”said Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier. “It was obvious to our officers who responded that the protesters engaged in escalated unlawful tactics and behavior during this event. This protest was intentionally coordinated and planned by agitators with the specific intent to engage in illegal activities.”

DAPL

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More Sustainable (and Beautiful) Alternatives to a Grass Lawn

Manicured turf grass lawns cover up to 50 million acres of land in America. But a new, no-mow movement is challenging this conformity—and helping the environment.

Adams County PA Master Gardener, BBG Graduate, and NRDC Member, Audrey Hillman

In a case of taking “the grass is always greener” a bit too literally, American homeowners have long strived to make their lawns brighter, lusher, and more velvety than their neighbors’. But all that competition has a devastating environmental impact. Every year across the country, lawns consume nearly 3 trillion gallons of water a year, 200 million gallons of gas (for all that mowing), and 70 million pounds of pesticides.

You may also know that turf grass, however welcoming it looks for our bare feet, provides virtually no habitat for pollinators and other animals and plants that make up a healthy, diverse ecosystem. In fact, these lawns can do substantial harm to the environment and to both vertebrates and insects. Birds, for instance, may ingest berries and seeds that have absorbed pesticides from the ground. Likewise, rainwater runoff from lawns can carry pesticides and fertilizers into rivers, lakes, streams, and oceans via the sewer system. This can poison fish and other aquatic animals and harm humans who swim, surf, and eat seafood that may be contaminated. And then, of course, lawn mowers can pollute the air.

Luckily, today more Americans are ready for a change. “We’re on the cusp of a transition that will likely take place over the next 10 to 15 years, away from the conformity of mowed turf,” says Ed Osann, senior policy analyst and water efficiency project director with NRDC’s Water program. He adds that eradication of all grass isn’t the goal. “We’re not declaring war on turf or suggesting that we remove every square foot of it. But we want to encourage people to think about whether there are places in their yards that can be converted to allow for a more diverse and sustainable landscape.”

 

The No-Mow Movement

A growing number of homeowners are converting part or all of their lawns to a less thirsty form of landscape. These no-mow yards fall into four categories: 1) naturalized or unmowed turf grass that is left to grow wild; 2) low-growing turf grasses that require little grooming (most are a blend of fescues); 3) native or naturalized landscapes where turf is replaced with native plants as well as noninvasive, climate-friendly ones that can thrive in local conditions; and 4) yards where edible plants—vegetables and fruit-bearing trees and shrubs—replace a portion of turf. (According to the National Gardening Association, one in three families now grows some portion of the food they consume.)

Making the Change

A successful lawn conversion depends on climate, terrain, and of course individual taste. Of the four main no-mow strategies, Osann says, native or naturalized landscaping is likely your best option. It’s adaptable to any part of the country and offers gardeners an infinite range of design possibilities. If you want to join the no-mow movement, here are some pointers to get you started:

  • Get expert advice. Begin by talking with a landscaper who has experience with lawn conversions, or even a neighbor who has naturalized all or part of his yard. A landscaper can help remove existing grass and recommend native plants to use in its place. Depending on water and weather, a low-growing turf lawn will “green up” about two weeks after seeding. Another alternative is a wildflower garden grown from seed. (Just make sure you choose a wildflower mix that fits your climate, and weed out existing vegetation that would compete for moisture and sun.) After the seeds germinate and the flowers bloom (in 6 to 12 weeks), they don’t require watering unless there’s a prolonged drought.
  • Do your weeding. Invasive plants like ragweed, thistle, and burdock can crowd out their native neighbors and may run afoul of local ordinances (as noted below). For most no-mow advocates, the payoff in natural beauty and habitat are well worth the effort.
  • Check for incentives. Not surprisingly, western states such as Arizona and California, which have been in the throes of extreme drought for more than four years, have taken the lead in spurring homeowners to do lawn conversions. California, in fact, launched a turf replacement initiative that offers rebates of up to $500 per yard for homeowners who convert turf lawns to native, drought-resistant xeriscaping. On a more grass-roots level, organizations like the Surfriders Foundation, a national environmental group made up of surfing aficionados, have helped transform turf lawns in Southern California parks and homes into ocean-friendly gardens, using succulents and other indigenous plants along with hardscape materials like rocks and gravel that increase filtration, conserve water, and reduce runoff.
  • Check the rule books. The no-mow movement may sound idyllic, but some practitioners have faced a surprising stumbling block: the law. In one example, Sarah Baker, a homeowner and scion of a family of horticulturalists in St. Albans Township, Ohio, decided to let her turf grass yard grow wild. Last year, she was forced to mow when authorities from her township deemed her garden, which had become a naturalized but well-tended landscape, a nuisance. Sandra Christos of Stone Harbor, New Jersey, says that after she replaced turf grass with native plants, she was delighted that cormorants, night herons, and kingfishers made themselves at home alongside “every kind of butterfly you can imagine.” But since receiving a letter from the town clerk, Christos has had to tame the mallow, bayberry, clethra, and rosa rugosa along her walkway—or pay a fine.
Sarah Baker in her yard

While local ordinances or homeowner association bans have emerged―mostly out of concern over fire safety, rodent control, and noxious weeds―they take on aesthetic concerns too, often proscribing grass over eight inches tall, vegetable gardens (especially in planned communities), or any kind of landscaping that deviates from clipped turf.

A recent white paper by students from Yale’s forestry and law schools, in collaboration with NRDC, surveyed legal obstacles to various forms of no-mow and concluded that, for sustainable landscaping to achieve wider adoption, some municipalities will need to adjust their policies.

That change can happen if residents push for it. Montgomery County, Maryland, for example, amended its nuisance laws to allow for naturalized lawns after locals made the case that their wild gardens improved air and soil quality and reduced stormwater runoff.

Moving away from water-guzzling and chemical-hungry lawns and cultivating yards that are diverse and self-regulating is a matter of mounting urgency worthy of that kind of community organizing. As global temperatures rise and droughts drag on, the demands of turf grass are likely to become untenable.

“Our existing lawns are going to get thirstier and their water requirements will increase,” Osann says. Fortunately, with an evolving toolkit of sustainable landscaping strategies, home gardeners can avoid such effects and help nurture the health of the planet—right in their own backyards.

Sourced from: nrdc.org

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